Adult

One of our goals for our members is to provide opportunities to learn and grow on their faith journeys. We offer several opportunities to read, hear, discuss and share information and experiences. Please explore these opportunities and join us!

Naomi Circle

The studies are written by Lutheran women clergy and theologians. Our membership is open to all who are interested in joining us.

January meeting will be in person (Youth Room) and on Zoom Tuesday, January 10, from 9:15 – 11:00 a.m.

Join us on the second Tuesday of the month at 9:15 a.m. in the Youth Room and on Zoom

Contact: Linda H.
holstell@outlook.com
563-370-8464
Contact: Sue S.
suesmith512@msn.com
863-326-4000
Contact: The church office

Manna Bible Study

Manna Bible study would like to encourage new faces to join us. All are welcome! We look forward to exploring the scriptures together.

Join us on Monday mornings at 9:00 a.m

Contact: Phyllis W. pkwright1360@gmail.com
303-772-1360
Contact: Pat W.
wilder.patr@eagle.uwlax.edu
608-385-1613

Star Words

Check back for 2023 Star Words.

Adult Forum

Meet on Sundays at 9:15 a.m. following the first service.


Contact: Pastor Katie
pastor@bethlehem-lutheran.net

Table Talk

The Wednesday Table Talk group meets on Wednesdays at 12:00 p.m. in the Fireside Room. Join us as we visit an important time in our national history and relate it to our Christian faith.

On Wednesday, November 9, we will begin a series using the PBS documentary On the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin. We will watch segments of the recently released film by Ken Burns and discuss it together. The film explores the revolutionary life of one of the 18th Century’s most consequential and compelling personalities, whose work and words unlocked the mystery of electricity and helped create the United States Constitution.

“His influence was unmatched in his time, and his impact remains with us today. ‘If you would not be forgotten as soon as you are dead and rotten’, Franklin said in Poor Richard’s Almanack, ‘either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing.’ Ben Franklin did both,” comments Ken Burns.